• Want to Be a Master Gardener? Free Information Night June 18th!

    Passionate about gardening? Passionate about volunteering? Toronto Master Gardeners might be just the group for you. At this information session, Toronto Master Gardeners will explain the program, describe the process of becoming a Master Gardener Trainee and answer your questions. 7 -8 pm, Monday, June 18 Toronto Botanical Garden 777 Lawrence Avenue East at Leslie Free parking. Registration is not necessary, but advised. Just email training@torontomastergardeners.ca You can check out the basics about the Master Gardener program

  • Fabulous Plants on Sale and Great Gardening Advice: the Perfect Combo May 11-13

    Free Toronto Master Gardeners Advice Clinics will be held each day of the Toronto Botanical Garden (TBG) annual plant sale, open to the public Friday, May 11, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Saturday & Sunday, May 12 & 13, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. TBG members enjoy a preview day on Thursday, May 10. For all the information on the plant sale, visit the TBG website here. And don't forget, all year long, the Toronto ...

  • Free Native Shrub in Return for Tree Planting, Richmond Hill May 12

    On Saturday May 12, 10:30 am to 12:30 pm, The Town of Richmond Hill, Regional Municipality of York and the Government of Ontario are supporting a morning of tree planting in Bridgeview Cordone Park. Volunteers at the event will be able to take home a free native shrub to plant (while supplies last). For full information on how to participate in this family-friendly event and to register for it, visit the LEAF site here.

  • Check for Black Knot Now

    The Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs (OMAFRA) has posted a notice reminding gardeners that Black Knot is easy to see on Prunus sp. at this time.  This large genus includes almond, peach, plum, cherry, and apricot among other popular flowering and fruit bearing trees. Gardeners should monitor gardens and adjacent wild areas for Prunus shrubs and trees with large black growths on previous years twigs. Below is an image of Black Knot of Prunus from the University ...

  • LEAF Publishes Handy Guide to Tree Damage

    LEAF (Local Enhancement & Appreciation of Forests) has issued a simple guide about the sources of physical damage that may affect your trees and how you can prevent or control them. You can find a copy here. And for more specific information on damage you may find on your trees, you may ask a Master Gardener for advice here.

  • Toronto Master Gardeners Free Advice Clinic Every Thursday at TBG Organic Farmers’ Market

    Sustainable gardening practices and organic foods make a great combo! Come to the Toronto Botanical Garden, 777 Lawrence Avenue East, every Thursday between 2:00 and 7:00 to ask gardening questions at the free Toronto Master Gardeners Advice Clinic, meet organic farmers and buy local produce, bread, meat, cheese, honey, and prepared food. Free parking is available on site. For more information about the Farmers' Market, click here.

  • On Feb 17 Toronto Master Gardeners Help You Get the Jump on Spring

    On Saturday, February 17, from 10am to 4pm, Toronto Master Gardeners will be on hand to answer your gardening questions at Get the Jump on Spring, the Toronto Botanical Garden’s annual Horticultural Open House. In addition to advice, demonstrations and presentations; more than 30 specialty vendors and artisans will be on hand and there will be a floral design competition and show as well as an organic farmers’ market, book sale and winter garden tours. And special ...

  • Toronto MP Urges Adoption of Bunchberry as Canadian National Flower

    M.P. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith (Beaches-East York) rose in the House on Monday December 4 to support the Master Gardeners of Ontario petition to make Bunchberry (Cornus canadensis) Canada's official floral emblem. To read the MP's media release, click here. And to see a video of his presentation to Parliament, click here.

  • STOP: Check Soil Moisture Before Fertilizing Trees and Shrubs

    Although we've had a few rainy nights recently, most Toronto gardens are still very dry, which means that it's not a good idea to apply fall fertilizers yet.  Dig down 6-10 inches to see if you can feel some moisture and see the soil particles adhering together when you squeeze a handful. By splitting annual fertilizer requirements into separate fall and spring applications, we can actually maximize plant uptake of important nutrients such as nitrogen.  Potassium is another ...

  • Manage Beech Scale Now

    Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs (OMAFRA) has posted a notice advising that at this time of year, the white waxy covering that female Introduced Beech scale (Cryptococcus fagisugae) produce to protect their eggs is easier to see  on native American beech (Fagus grandifolia).  Look for tiny tufts of white, cottony-like masses on the main trunk and large branches and plan to treat them with horticultural oil or by pressure washing the tree trunks. ...