Protection of early spring flowers and plants during freezing temps

(Question)

I have a lot of early tulips and early spring plants coming up in my garden. How can I best protect my early spring flowering bulbs and other tender garden plants during weather fluctuations or freezing temperatures?

 

 

 

(Answer)

 

No need to cover cold-hardy plants from spring snows and frosts. They'll tolerate them easily--so you can concentrate on protecting the more tender plants in your garden. Picture: dwarf tulips.Pin It

No need to cover cold-hardy plants to protect from spring snows and frosts. They’ll tolerate them easily–so you can concentrate on protecting the more tender plants in your garden. Picture: dwarf tulips.

There is no need to cover cold-hardy plants from spring snows and frosts. They’ll tolerate them easily  if you have chosen cold hardy plants. Some vegetables and flowers are hardy and thrive in spite of (or sometimes because of) the cold.

Flowers: Crocuses often push their way through snow to bloom, and a spring storm rarely gives narcissus, tulips, grape hyacinths, or pansies problems. Mulching your bulbs and early spring plants in the autumn does help. The mulch should only be removed as soon as the danger of severe freezing has passed in the early spring.

Vegetables: Like pansies, calendula is an edible flower that’s frost resistant. Other cold-hardy edibles include broccoli, cabbage, carrots, chives, leeks, lettuce, peas, radish, spinach, and Swiss chard.

Other suggestions for protection are:

Cover plants before nightfall and/or cover plants with cloches

Avoid frost pockets when you plant your bulbs or plant material

Protect potted plants. When frost is predicted, bring planters and hanging baskets inside.