Trailing succulent

(Question)

Hi,

Would you be able to identify this trailing succulent for me? I’ve had it for two years (came with no label on it). Pointy leaves with hairy stems…has done well in my sunroom in part shade. Thanks.

(Answer)

Hello, and thank you for your question — challenging question, I should say. Because we don’t yet have a specific ID for you… yet.

The most evident aspect of your plant is that it is a succulent. Succulents have leaves, stems and sometimes roots, that are thick and fleshy, developed to survive dry air, and dry soil. They are famous for their diversity as house plants.

Next, you say that your plant has long, thin hairs growing along the stems. As best as I can see, they’re growing around the junctures where the leaves attach to the stems. You mention that your plant hangs in your sunroom. But while your plant is currently trailing its branches from the hanging pot, it could very well be a crawling plant.

Succulents can be propagated both from stem cuttings, as well as leaves that develop roots at their ends. And even though your plant hangs in partial shade, your sunroom could be pleasantly warm, and humid enough, that those “hairs ” on your plant are actually air roots. Your plant stems are becoming  a bit brown, and a bit older, and your plant is possibly attempting to propagate.

Thirdly, the leaves, where the growth is freshest, seem to be forming into whorls. You didn’t mention if the plant has flowered for you, or described the flower: do you have an image you could forward?

One Family your plant was considered to possibly belong to was Asteraceae, Genus Senecio. One species of this genus that many gardeners are familiar with is rowleyanus, commonly known as  ‘String of Pearls’. But, as interesting as this species is, this is clearly not your plant.

A better suggestion might be that your plant is of the Family Crassulaceae, Genus Sedum. From there it could be one of hundreds of species or hybrids. One well-known species is Sedum morganianum, or Burro’s Tail, native to South America,  a flowering plant well-suited for indoor or outdoor patio hanging pots.

Until we determine an ID, for you,  please rest assured that you are not alone, by any means, in the ongoing search for identification among the many hundreds of species of succulents throughout the world.

 

Again, thank you for the challenge — if you could possibly send an image of the blossoms, that would assist with identification.  Thank you !