Low light indoor climber

(Question)

Looking for an indoor plant in our north-facing bathroom. Ideally a climber, but we’d consider a plant that would eventually grow larger.
Thank you!

(Answer)

 

Hello and thank you for reaching out to us at the Toronto Master Gardener website.

A visit to your local garden center tropical plant section will give you lots of options for a suitable plant for your bathroom.  As most Tropicals require high humidity, your bathroom is the perfect spot to give them the moisture they will need.  The challenge will be to find a plant that will thrive in the low light conditions of your north facing bathroom.

One of my favorite indoor plants is the easy care Chlorophytum comosum Spider plant

This plant is very adaptable to many conditions and is not prone to many problems. It is not a climber but it makes an attractive hanging plant because of its trailing nature and once the plant matures  “baby plants” or plantlets  hang down giving this plant a fuller look.  It is also thought to be a very effective air cleaner!   Feed every 2 weeks spring through summer with a liquid fertilizer diluted by half.

If Spider plants are not your style, here are some other suggestions:

Ficus pumila, Creeping  Fig Vine

Can tolerate dimmer light than other Ficus.  With Ficus pumila keep soil evenly moist. Also keep away from cold drafts as leaves may drop if plant experiences a sudden change in temperature. Add peat moss to a standard soil mix.

Cissus rhombifolia, Grape Ivy

Vine-like. Easy to grow.  Prefers bright indirect light but will tolerate low light. Water it thoroughly but let soil become moderately dry between watering. Fertilize during the growth periods but with the low light, reduce the level of fertilization. Put a layer of pebbles in the bottom of the container, as the plant need good drainage.

Epipremnum aureum, Pothos, Devil’s Ivy

Climbing vine similar to philodendrons.  At low light levels, leaves often lose colour markings and revert to all green. Let soil dry out slightly between watering.  Do not over water.  Fertilize no more than 2-3 times per year and only when plant is actively growing. With new plants wait 4-6 months before feeding.  Night temperatures 65-70 degrees.  Daytime 75-85 degrees

This link will give you some more information regarding growing houseplants.

http://www.torontomastergardeners.ca/gardeningguides/beginners-guide-to-growing-houseplants-a-toronto-master-gardeners-guide/