HOW WE'RE HELPING GARDENERS DURING COVID-19:

While we can't meet you in person until the health crisis ends, our volunteers are still active and available to assist you online.
We are currently offering virtual advice clinics, presentations and workshops via Zoom. Here are just a few of the many presentations we offer:
  • Houseplants: Our Constant Garden
  • Landscaping with Trees and Large Shrubs
  • Putting the Garden to Bed

Have a garden question? Visit our Ask a Master Gardener page.
We'll update this notice if things change. Meanwhile, stay safe, and happy gardening.

Believe it or not, the first frost date for the GTA is late September. If a frost is forecast, protect tender plants with an old sheet; bring in plants that cannot withstand any frost and harvest fruits/vegetables that will be damaged by even a light frost. ... See MoreSee Less

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While moving and dividing your spring and summer blooming perennials, enrich the entire area with compost, not the planting holes. ... See MoreSee Less

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Many butterflies overwinter here. Find a corner of your garden that is in the sun and out of the wind where you can create a brush pile and have some leaf litter in which the butterflies can hibernate – a little bit of wilderness for them. ... See MoreSee Less

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Make sure you clear all diseased material from your garden to prevent pest and disease problems next spring. Burn the diseased material or put it in the garbage, not in your compost! Clean, healthy plant debris can be chopped up and spread over the beds in a shallow layer. ... See MoreSee Less

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Planting a tree too deep can kill it. The flare (the base of the tree where the trunk becomes wider – just above the roots) should be left exposed. If it's covered with soil or mulch, the tree base will rot and the tree will die. This tree is at risk! ... See MoreSee Less

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Take advantage of the still-warm soil and upcoming rains by planting trees, shrubs, and evergreens. When selecting a tree or shrub, consider mature size; exposure to sun, wind and road salt; tolerance to urban pollution; soil and drainage. The right plant in the right location! ... See MoreSee Less

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Toronto Master Gardeners

The Toronto Master Gardeners are volunteers committed to providing the public with horticultural information, education and inspiration. The resources and services available through this site are designed to help Toronto residents use safe, effective, proven and sustainable horticultural practices to create gardens, landscapes and communities that are both vibrant and healthy.

Gardening Guides

Our useful Gardening Guides provide introductory information for the home gardener about a broad range of horticultural topics.

Book A Master Gardener

Local organizations can book our volunteers to deliver horticultural presentations, provide question and answer sessions, and staff advice clinics.

Become a Master Gardener

If you’re in Toronto, here’s how to become a Master Gardener:

Ask A Master Gardener

Toronto Master Gardeners are happy to answer your gardening questions posted on this site, called in to our Infoline or asked in person at our scheduled events.

Gardening Tips

Throughout the year, Toronto Master Gardeners post brief gardening tips on this site to help you with your seasonal gardening tasks.

Partners:

Master Gardeners of Ontario

Compost Council of Canada

Toronto Region Conservation Authority

Toronto Botanical Gardens

City of Toronto

Toronto Public Library

Toronto Master Gardeners Code of Conduct

The Toronto Master Gardeners (TMG) is an organization committed to fostering an environment in which everyone we engage with, including fellow members and the general public, is treated with dignity and respect, regardless of race, national or ethnic origin, colour, age, gender, sexual identity or sexual orientation, religion, political affiliation or abilities. All members are expected to adhere to this principle.

The TMG does not tolerate any form of discrimination, harassment, abuse or bullying.

If you feel that the code of conduct has been breached, please contact the executive coordinator or assistant coordinator, whose contact information can be found here.